Go to Top

Intergenerational mobility across the world: Where socioeconomic status of parents matters the most (and least)

Ambar Narayan, Roy Van der Weide, (2018) «Intergenerational mobility across the world: Where socioeconomic status of parents matters the most (and least)», VoxEU, 2 Ιουλίου

A society with high (relative) intergenerational mobility is one where an individual’s wellbeing, relative to others of his or her generation, is less dependent on the socioeconomic status of his or her parents. Arguably, there are two main reasons why higher relative mobility in a society should be a goal for public policy: fairness and economic efficiency. When mobility is low, one’s chances of success are largely pre-ordained by the accident of birth, which goes against a basic notion of fairness in most societies. Also, low mobility leads to unrealised human potential and misallocation of resources, as talented individuals from disadvantaged families are excluded from opportunities that favour those born in greater privilege rather than those with the greatest potential. Reducing such inefficiency is likely to be good for economic growth. And since the waste of human potential is more likely at the bottom of the income distribution, policies promoting higher relative mobility are likely to promote growth that is more inclusive in nature.

Σχετικές Αναρτήσεις